The Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature’s Most Epic Road Trips | Atlas Obscura

Source: The Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature’s Most Epic Road Trips | Atlas Obscura

BY RICHARD KREITNER (WRITER), STEVEN MELENDEZ (MAP) / 20 JUL 2015

Atlas Obscura's Guide To Literary Road Trips

Take a little spin round the USA through eyes of Atlas Obscura’s Literary Road Trip map.

Only one of the many amazingly curious things t see on this great website of world wide oddities and amazing places.

My vacation planning now starts at this site!

The Mystery Of Ephemeral Order

Fenton Photo with canon balls.

Luminary fact-hunter, Errol Morris, is recorded in this appearance on Radio Lab.
One of his most recent searches for truth led him across the globe to discover the truth behind one particular photograph. Taken in 1855 during the Crimean War, the photo — titled “The Valley of the Shadow of Death” by its photographer, Roger Fenton — is one of the first photos ever taken of war. Morris wanted to know whether this also was in fact the first “Staged” photograph.

You see there are actually two photos, taken from the same spot, at the same time, but very different…..so which came first?

Hope you enjoy this adventure through time and into a photograph.

Vintage Posters Up For Sale

An auction of vintage Post Office posters will provide funds for a new museum highlighting five centuries of social, communication and design history behind the postal service.

selection of vintage General Post Office posters are to be put up for sale as part of an online auction to raise money for The Postal Museum and Mail Rail.

Created by some of the most prominent artists and designers of their time, the original posters are duplicates from the collections in the British Postal Museum and Archive and will be put up for auction by Onslows Auction House in Dorset on July 9.

The images, made between the 1930s and 1960s, focus on a range of subjects, from airmail to pleas for the careful packing of parcels.

Adrian Steel, the director of the museum and archive, praised the creativity of the designers and highlighted the importance of the posters. “Along with a number of other trendsetting organisations, the GPO broke the mould with its marketing in the 1930s,” he suggested.

“Auctioning this striking series of posters prior to moving to The Postal Museum gives the public a rare opportunity to own a piece of iconic design.”

a photo of a poster featuring a women holding roses that have been unpacked from a parcel. Next to her reads the text ‘Properly packed parcels please’.
Poster advising correct packaging of parcels by Harry Stevens, June 1962
© Royal Mail Group courtesy of The British Postal Museum & Archive
Some of the most prominent artists and designers of the time were commissioned to create these images. The posters going on sale include works by Edward McKnight Kauffer, Stan Krol, Jan Le Witt and George Him.

Many of the artists went on to make iconic designs for places such as London Transport and the Ministry of Information with posters made to support the war effort during the Second World War.

“The funds raised will support our ambitious plans for a new, national museum and unique subterranean experience on the Mail Rail,” added Steel.

The Postal Museum will have permanent exhibition galleries and a temporary exhibition space bringing social, communication and design history from the past five centuries to London.

There are also plans to open up a section of the old Post Office Underground Railway, Mail Rail, allowing the public to take a ride through some of the original tunnels beneath the capital. Visit postalmuseum.org for more.

A selection of the posters will be available to view at the Chalke Valley History Festival until June 28. Onslows can also be contacted for a private viewing on 01258 488838 or onslow.auctions@btinternet.com.image

Summer Sale: 50% OFF EVERYTHING @ 9 Miles Of Wonder on Etsy

Get On Board With The Summer Sale. All Items Are 50% off!! Vintage Sports items, Photos, Maps, Books & Art are just some of the things you will

Source: 9 MILES OF EPHEMERA & ANTIQUES by 9MilesOfWonder on Etsy

My-web-sample

How Ephemera Changed Capitalism in 19th Century In America

Or, more specifically: How a 19th Century organ manufacturer exploited paper advertising to fuel the engine of commerce.

From THE COMMONS (Windham County, Vermont) we learn of a great event happening this weekend:

“The Estey Company, along with thousands of other 19th century companies, was both a part of, and the epitome of, the driving force determining the personality and being of the United States: American Capitalism. By exploring the Estey product and its place in the American home, we find an example of how early American Capitalism worked.”

Estey Organ Museum sponsors a talk with Kit Barry titled “The Estey Organ — Its Place in the Emergence of American Capitalism” at its Engine House Gallery, 108 Birge St., this Sunday, June 29, at 3 p.m.

Kit Barry, is curator of the Ephemera Archive for American Studies in Brattleboro and has been collecting ephemera since he was a teenager.

Read more about the event and the history of Estey Organ Company by following the link below.

Welcome to THE COMMONS — News and Views for Windham County, Vermont.

Also check the 9 Miles of Ephemera Events Calendar for details and directions to this fascinating glimpse into ephemera research.

Here is another article featuring paper dolls that Estey distributed as advertising. “Estey Organ Company: Advertising Paper Dolls”

Dolls Of America And Her New Possessions: Cuba doll

Cuba Doll Verso

Estey Cuba Doll Interior

9 MILES of ANNIVERSARY SALE by 9MilesOfWonder on Etsy

To celebrate the 9th anniversary of 9 Miles of Ephemera & Antiques we are having a huge sale.
Check out all the gems!

Catch the deals while they last!
Catch the deals while they last!

9 MILES OF EPHEMERA & ANTIQUES by 9MilesOfWonder on Etsy.

History under the floorboards

History under the floorboards

Among the recent donations to Leeds Museums was this collection of “rubbish” which was found under the floorboards of a house in Roundhay.  The scraps of paper, torn-up letters and old cigarette packets might easily have been thrown away but the flat’s owners knew the history of the house and took a closer look.  Several of the torn envelopes had post-marks from 1943 and were addressed to officers of the 111 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery who had been billeted at the house during the Second World War. 

This small collection of discarded ephemera shines a small light on life in an officer’s mess in the summer of 1943.  They had time to go to the theatre, as there is a ticket from the Leeds Empire.  They got their writing paper courtesy of the YMCA and seem to have had to go as far as Batley to get their laundry done (there is a receipt from Batley Laundry Ltd.).  They may have had contact with G.I.’s as at least one of the razor blade packets is American.  Above all, they were heavy smokers and left behind large number of cigarette packets and matchboxes (Woodbines being the favoured brand).

There are many questions that we will never find answers to.  The collection includes some personal letters from wives and family back home, which have been screwed up and thrown away rather than lovingly kept.  The letters themselves mostly talk of banal everyday life on the home front with bits of local gossip.

Perhaps this extract from a letter written by Ida (from Surrey) to her “Dearest Dick” may indicate why he threw her letter away:

“Marie says that I was to tell you she still likes Ann Shelton better than Vera Lynn. Well Dear I hope you will be able to get home soon as there is still quite a bit of rubbish needs clearing up in the garden.”

All in all, a fascinating little glimpse of life in war-time Leeds.

via Blog details.

Giving New Life To Old Paper

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