A history of the modern world as told by everyday throwaway ephemera | Public Radio International

 Credit: Courtesy Philipp Penka Special issue of a Russian emigre periodical, published from 1963-65. This issue was published a week after the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The issue begins with an article entitled "Black Friday," describing the view of an Orthodox Russian emigre on the tragic events. The editors were associated with the Russian Orthodox Church abroad.
Credit: Courtesy Philipp Penka
Special issue of a Russian emigre periodical, published from 1963-65. This issue was published a week after the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The issue begins with an article entitled “Black Friday,” describing the view of an Orthodox Russian emigre on the tragic events. The editors were associated with the Russian Orthodox Church abroad.

For myself, collecting Ephemera is an extremely thrilling activity because of the hunt and discovery process. Ephemera hunters are able to find magical, little pieces which in many cases document historical phenomena that aren’t yet recorded. Enjoy a bit of this experience with this article from Alina Simone Using interviews with collectors, Ms. Simone shows us examples of this process of piecing together our shared history.

This article shares in the ephemeral titillation felt by collectors and helps to dispel the myth out there that “everything has already been digitized and is available through Google search.”

See the original article here:

A history of the modern world as told by everyday throwaway ephemera | Public Radio International.

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