An Older View of Washington State

Grainger Topographical Map of Washington State 1909

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Clyde

Map is 16″ x 24″

From research I have gleaned that Grainger did this map while working after college for the Washington State in putting together various projects on the geology, topography, and road materials of the state. Some of this work was collected in the Washington Bulletin of 1911, The Road Materials of Washington, by Henry Landes, assisted by Olaf Stromme and Clyde Grainger.

Soon after this project, Grainger moved on to drafting for architect Harlan Thomas in Seattle.

From Thomas’ biography with Pacific Coast Architecture Database:
https://digital.lib.washington.edu/architect/architects/2255/

“About 1910, Thomas entered into the first of several partnerships which would be the focus of his professional career thereafter:
Thomas, Russell and Rice
Thomas and Grainger
Thomas, Grainger and Thomas (with Clyde Grainger (1887–1958) and his own son, Donald P. Thomas (1898–1970)).

Among the best known of the projects of these partnerships are the Corner Market Building (1911–12) in the Pike Place Market, and (in joint venture with W. Marbury Somervell) several branch libraries in Seattle—Queen Anne, Columbia, and Henry L. Yesler (now Douglass-Truth). The best-known project of the Thomas, Grainger and Thomas partnership is the Art Deco-influenced Harborview Hospital (1929–31).

Pikes place design:
The 3-story Corner Market building (Harlan Thomas & Clyde Grainger 1912; rehabilitation by Karlis Rekevics, 1975) sits on the right as one enters the Market along Pike Street. In its early years it included daystalls, and the businesses facing onto First Avenue were open-fronted. The Three Girls Bakery, the first known business in the Corner Market, is now located in the adjacent Sanitary Market. The basement was home to Patti Summers’ jazz club for over two decades before becoming Can Can in 2006; the building is also home to anarchist bookstore Left Bank Books, as well as numerous other businesses.[139][142][143]

Following his career as an Architect, Grainger served on the Seattle Planning Commission.

In December 1951 the Wedgwood District Community Club appealed to the Seattle City Planning Commission to disapprove applications for the construction of duplex houses at 7518 43rd Ave NE and 4303 NE 77th Street. The three-man committee of the Planning Commission which took the arguments under study, was headed by architect Clyde Grainger. Grainger certainly was familiar with Wedgwood as he, along with architect Harlan Thomas, had designed Albert Balch’s original Wedgwood-development houses in 1940. Clyde Grainger lived in View Ridge one block over from Albert Balch’s own home on 50th Ave NE. By the late 1940’s Harlan Thomas had retired, but Grainger still worked at their architectural office and Grainger continued to contribute to the development of Wedgwood. In the period 1948 to 1951 Grainger’s architectural firm, which included Harlan Thomas’ son Donald Thomas, designed Balch’s office buildings from 8014 to 8050 35th Ave NE.

This piece is available on etsy.com at 9 Miles of Wonder on Etsy

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2/24/2013 –
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Toronto Postcard Club 32nd Annual Show
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Maine Antique Paper Show
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