Tag Archives: old paper

History under the floorboards

History under the floorboards

Among the recent donations to Leeds Museums was this collection of “rubbish” which was found under the floorboards of a house in Roundhay.  The scraps of paper, torn-up letters and old cigarette packets might easily have been thrown away but the flat’s owners knew the history of the house and took a closer look.  Several of the torn envelopes had post-marks from 1943 and were addressed to officers of the 111 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery who had been billeted at the house during the Second World War. 

This small collection of discarded ephemera shines a small light on life in an officer’s mess in the summer of 1943.  They had time to go to the theatre, as there is a ticket from the Leeds Empire.  They got their writing paper courtesy of the YMCA and seem to have had to go as far as Batley to get their laundry done (there is a receipt from Batley Laundry Ltd.).  They may have had contact with G.I.’s as at least one of the razor blade packets is American.  Above all, they were heavy smokers and left behind large number of cigarette packets and matchboxes (Woodbines being the favoured brand).

There are many questions that we will never find answers to.  The collection includes some personal letters from wives and family back home, which have been screwed up and thrown away rather than lovingly kept.  The letters themselves mostly talk of banal everyday life on the home front with bits of local gossip.

Perhaps this extract from a letter written by Ida (from Surrey) to her “Dearest Dick” may indicate why he threw her letter away:

“Marie says that I was to tell you she still likes Ann Shelton better than Vera Lynn. Well Dear I hope you will be able to get home soon as there is still quite a bit of rubbish needs clearing up in the garden.”

All in all, a fascinating little glimpse of life in war-time Leeds.

via Blog details.

A Century of Posters opens at Tap Seac Gallery- MACAU DAILY TIMES –

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Thru August 24th, visitors to the Tap Seac Gallery in Macau can view an exhibit featuring poster art produced between 1880 and 1990.

The exhibition includes lithographs by Jules Chéret, the so-called “Roi de l’affiche” by Alfons Maria Mucha, as well as pieces by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Leonetto Cappiello, Joost Schmidt and Raymond Savignac, among others.

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Macua, also spelled Macao, is one of the two Special Administrative Regions of the People’s Republic of China, the other being Hong Kong. Macau lies on the western side of the Pearl River Delta across from Hong Kong to the east, which is about 64 kilometers, also bordered by Guangdong Province to the north and facing the South China Sea to the east and south. (from Wikipedia)

2014611173855LMacau Century of posters exhibit

Read more here:
MACAU DAILY TIMES – A Century of Posters opens at Tap Seac Gallery.

“You Found The Ancient Manuscript Where?” ‘Texts and Textiles’ : Finding Manuscripts in Unusual Places | The Conveyor

‘Texts and Textiles’ : Finding Manuscripts in Unusual Places | The Conveyor

Cover image from "Holy Skirts. Dresses for sculptures in Wienhausen Abbey"
Cover image from “Holy Skirts. Dresses for sculptures in Wienhausen Abbey”

Most folks know that long before “upcycling” became a buzzword, the reuse of materials was a common practice. However we are still discovering interesting ways that our ancestors put their discards back to use.

Research that began in 2011 reveals how textile conservators discovered fragments of medieval manuscripts lining the hems of dresses. The dresses, made by nuns in the late 15th century, clothed the statues at their Cistercian convent of Weinhausen in Northern Germany.

Proving again that you just never know what treasure you may find and where you might find it.

#findingtreasure #AncientUpcycling

Read more here about this fascinating find and the research behind it.

‘’Texts and Textiles’’ : Finding Manuscripts in Unusual Places | The Conveyor.

Read more information on the book here

Almost Time For The May Run of the Brimfield Antique Show By Lori Stabile | Special to The Republican

Brimfield 1800 from a sketch by Colonel John W. Foster
Brimfield 1800 from a sketch by Colonel John W. Foster

Great article on the Brimfield Outdoor Antiques Show next week. Go for the Brimfield Paper & Postcard Marathon beginning May 9th and stay for the Antiques blitz!

By Lori Stabile | Special to The Republican
It’s almost time for the May installment of the Brimfield Outdoor Antiques Shows, a thrice annual event that draws antique lovers from near and far to the tiny town of Brimfield, Mass. for six days at a time.

The May show – known as the largest antique show of the three – opens Tuesday, May 13 and runs through Sunday, May 18.

What is usually farmland transforms into a giant outdoor antique sale, featuring thousands of dealers on 23 fields selling almost everything imaginable – giant Ronald McDonald heads, garden items, 1950s dishes, postcards from various eras, music equipment, furniture, vintage jewelry and clothing and more.

It was 1959 when Gordon Reid got the idea to hold an outdoor antique show.

His daughters, Judith R. Mathieu and Jill R. Lukesh, continue the tradition their father started, on the J&J Promotions field, which is open only on Friday and Saturday and hosts 400 dealers.

Opening times vary according to field, with most opening Tuesday. Check www.brimfieldshow.com for specific field opening times.

The first “show” featured 67 dealers selling items on tarps in front of their station wagons, Mathieu said, describing the event as “rustic.”

Asked what Reid would think about Brimfield has become, Mathieu replied, “Oh my gosh, he would be thrilled. He would be quite honored, I’m sure.”

She said that she and her sister have maintained the quality that her father wanted on his field, ensuring dealers are selling antiques and not new items.

Because the family has been involved in the shows so long, Mathieu has plenty of advice for first-timers to the shows (the next show is in July, followed by the last one in September).

Dress comfortably, she suggests, and bring cash, as many dealers do not accept credit cards.

And bargain. Dealers expect it, Mathieu said, “but be fair in your offer.”

Even though Brimfield has been around now for many years, Mathieu said they still hear people tell them that this is their first time.

“People are just thrilled to be here,” Mathieu said.

Celebrity sightings are not unusual at Brimfield – home decor maven Martha Stewart, hockey great Terry O’Reilly, singer-actress Barbra Streisand and director-actress Penny Marshall all have been spotted in recent years.

Donald G. Moriarty, co-owner of Heart O’ the Mart with his wife Pamela, predicts that the May show will be “great.” They have been involved in the antiques show for the past 32 years, and he said he’s been seeing more international buyers at the shows.

“Each year seems to get a little bit bigger,” Moriarty said.

His field opens Wednesday at 9 a.m. with approximately 450 dealers. Like Mathieu, he advises people to dress “for comfort, not style” and in layers.

“Bring your wallet . . . Allocate as much time as you possibly can because it’s a huge, huge show,” Moriarty said.

Some fields charge admission. The next shows are July 8 to 13, and September 2 to 7.

Here is where to find maps and brochures for the Brimfield Show

Re-posted from Mass Live

Everything Is On Sale This Week at 9MilesOfWonder on Etsy

9 MILES OF EPHEMERA & ANTIQUES by 9MilesOfWonder on Etsy.

Everything is 25% off this week!

Find something for Mom today and it will be shipped to arrive by Saturday.

Or buy Mom and Etsy Gift Card and point her towards 9 Miles Of Wonder on Etsy so she can choose her own gift!

Listings will be added throughout the day and tomorrow so if there is a special item you are looking for don’t hesitate to email me. I have a ton of items available which aren’t listed.

Enjoy your shopping on my and the other great shops on Etsy.com.

Sale ends May 17th!!!

Cheers!
cdavid

The Auction that Launched the Antiques Trade

As a lover of antiques and of the wonderful LOVEJOY series on the BBC, I was happy to find this article to share. Great information by Wayne Jordan on what is said to be the auction that started it all.
Enjoy!

1 Marlborough Estate

As Captain-Generalcy of the English forces, John Churchill was the commander of the English troops at the Battle of Blenheim in Bavaria (1704). His clever tactics enabled him to beat his French opponents, and the Monarchy awarded him the title Duke of Marlborough and an estate (above) named in recognition of his successful battle at Blenheim.

The antiques business began in July, 1886.

At least, that’s the claim made by author Jonathan Gash in his book “Paid and Loving Eyes” (Penguin, 1993). Gash is the creator of the Lovejoy character, a roguish antiques dealer whose escapades are recounted in more than two dozen novels and 71 BBC television shows.

I enjoyed watching the BBC series (what’s not to like about Ian McShane?), but there was little to be learned about antiques by doing so. That’s not the case with the books, however. Although the Lovejoy novels are works of fiction, Gash (real name John Grant) doesn’t stray far from the facts when he discusses antiques. He devotes a lot of detail—sometimes pages—to describing the antiques that are the catalysts for his stories. He also goes into great detail about how forgeries and fakes are made, and how common they are in the antiques trade. Want to know about 18th-century German snuff boxes? Lovejoy will tell you. Want to fake a Sheraton table or age a freshly painted watercolor? Lovejoy gives up those secrets. If I didn’t know better, I’d think that Gash/Grant was an accomplished forger; he seems to know a little too much about how to fake antiques. (He was actually a physician and university professor).

2 John Churchill, the First Duke of Marlborough
John Churchill, the First Duke of Marlborough

So, when I read Gash’s claim that the antiques trade began in July of 1886, I paid attention. I’d never known anyone to try to pin a “start date” on the antiques business. I consulted my old friend Google to check the claim myself. Here’s Gash’s claim, from the above book:

“Once upon a time, antiques were a rarified pursuit for scholars… they spent fortunes, and founded private museums. Until July 1886. In that month, the great antiques hunt began when an auctioneer intoned “Lot One” and the Duke of Marlborough’s Blenheim Palace’s magnificent treasures—art, furniture, statuary—went under the hammer… the Great Antiques Rush was on.”

As it turns out, Gash wasn’t too far off regarding the date and spot-on regarding the contents of the auction. The Duke’s possessions were, in fact, auctioned off over a period of several weeks in late June/early July in 1886. In just a few generations, the Marlborough “dynasty” went from fame and fortune to dissolution under the auctioneer’s hammer.

The first Duke of Marlborough, John Churchill, was initially a page in the Court of Stuart. Through his political savvy and a marriage to Queen Anne’s close friend Sarah Jennings, Churchill rose to the Captain-Generalcy of the English forces. When the War of Spanish Succession broke out, Churchill found himself commanding the English troops at the Battle of Blenheim in Bavaria (1704). His clever tactics enabled him to beat his French opponents, and the Monarchy awarded him the title Duke of Marlborough and an estate named in recognition of his successful battle at Blenheim.

John Churchill died in 1722, and his title and property passed through various successors over the next 150 years. The Churchills (and later Spencers), though not among England’s most prosperous families, were well-to-do and spent a considerable sum furnishing Blenheim Palace. The Fifth Duke of Marlborough was a real spendthrift and bought the family right into an awkward financial position. What was awkward for the family, though, turned out to be good for launching the antiques trade in 1886.

3 1st Marlb auction catalogue

The first Marlborough auction catalog from June 1886.

4 2nd catalogue 1886
The second Marlborough auction catalog from July 1886.

5 3rd catalogue 1886
The third Marlborough auction catalog from July 1886.

6 terms of auctions
The terms and conditions of Marlborough auctions.

As the grip of the Industrial Revolution tightened around England’s economy, the “Old World” economy of wealthy landowners and tenant farmers began to collapse. By the turn of the 20th Century, many Peerage estates found themselves in financial difficulty. The fastest way for an estate to raise cash was by selling off their vast collections of art, jewelry and furniture.

By 1870, the family’s financial situation was so bad that the Seventh Duke began to sell off family assets. Real estate (other than Blenheim) was sold, as well as personal property, including the famous Marlborough gems. When the amount raised proved to be insufficient to pay his debts, the Duke petitioned Parliament to break the estate’s entail and allow liquidation of the estate. Under English law, estates were required to follow a strict method of inheritance, called an entail. To accommodate the Duke’s request, an act of Parliament was required. When the Blenheim Settled Estates Act of 1880 was passed, the Duke was free to call an auctioneer and arrange for the liquidation of the estate. The Duke’s descendants, including Sir Winston Churchill and Lady Diana Spencer (“Princess Di”) could claim descendancy from Marlborough but didn’t benefit from the Blenheim money.

7 james christie founder of Christies
A portrait of James Christie, founder of what would become the fames Christie’s auction house.

The Marlborough auction began on Saturday, June 26, 1886, and was conducted by the firm of Christie, Manson and Wood (which would become today’s “Christie’s”) at their London sale rooms. Auctioneer James Christie had started his auction business some 120 years earlier and his company was considered to be London’s finest auction house. In the 18th century, peerage auctions were uncommon, and much of Christie’s trade came from bankrupt merchants and private sales. In the late 19th- and early 20th-centuries, Christie’s became the auctioneer of choice for destitute aristocrats.

The Marlborough sale ran, off and on, for several weeks. Lots offered were furnishings, porcelain, rugs, silver and household goods; plus art and sculptures by Rubens, Van Dyck, Raphael, Rembrandt and others. A catalog of the first day’s sale, preserved by the University of California Los Angeles Library, can be seen here.

The Marlborough auction was certainly the most important auction of its time, but is it a fair assessment to use it as the start date for the antiques trade? I believe that it is, although I’m sure that there are those who think I’m crazy for believing so. In my opinion, it makes as much sense to ascribe June 1886 as the start date for the antiques business as it does to ascribe July 4, 1776, as the date of American Independence. Certainly there had been skirmishes with the British before July of 1776—most notably the battles at Concord and Lexington, and the Boston Tea Party—but in spite of those early skirmishes, we lay claim to the date of July 4, 1776, as the start of our independence. Similarly, there was antique buying and selling going on before June 1886. But the Duke of Marlborough’s auction was the watershed event that brought the antiques trade into general awareness. After that date, antiques were no longer the exclusive province of the gentry.

The turn of the 20th century, would see antique shops cropping up all over Europe, and in America they were found in the seaport towns of New York, Boston and New Orleans. In the 21st century, antiques are in vogue; there are thousands of shops in America alone and countless magazines, books, websites, blogs and television shows that cater to antiques collectors and enthusiasts. As Gash’s Lovejoy says:

“Now we’re all at it. Clever people draw graphs of antiques’ values, starting back in that summer of 1886. Don’t be fooled. It’s not a mathematical proposition. It’s not a philosophy. It’s a scramble.”

Wayne Jordan spent more than 40 years in the music business as a performer, teacher, repairman and music store owner. In 25 years of musical instrument retailing he has bought, sold, rented or repaired thousands of pianos, band & orchestra, combo, and folk instruments. Wayne is currently a Virginia-licensed auctioneer and certified personal property appraiser. For more info, visit Wayne Jordan Auctions.

Reposted from http://www.worthpoint.com

How To Make Art With Built In History “Archives Alchemy: the Art of the Dumpster Divers”

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Archives+Postcard-Inside

I am excited to have had the opportunity to have been involved with a wonderful group of Artists during my years spent in Philadelphia, PA. The Philly Dumpster Divers is a social collective of artists using found objects to create fabulous new works of art, functional furniture & lighting, clocks, and more. Beginning as a small group of friends meeting for lunch to talk about art over 20 years ago, the group has grown to around 30 creators and collectors who meet monthly to talk trash and exchange materials and ideas.

I am very pleased to announce that I will have a piece in the most recent exhibit of the Divers, which utilizes vintage ephemera and other discarded materials from the National Archives.
Hoping that East Coast readers will be able to see this show. There is also the possibility of the show traveling to other National Archive sites in the future.
I will keep you updated with photos from the current exhibit (once it opens) as well as with info on future exhibit dates and locations.

Here is the info from the Philly Dumpster Divers Facebook Event page:
Please join us for the opening reception of “Archives Alchemy: the Art of the Dumpster Divers” on Friday January 10th, 5 – 7:30pm. at the National Archives of Philadelphia 900 Market Street Philadelphia, PA 19107-4292. ( Please remember to bring a photo ID for admission into this Federal Building.)

The National Archives at Philadelphia had miles of microfilm and piles of deteriorating materials, doomed for the dumpster. They called the Dumpster Divers and asked us to make art from their castoffs.

    Show Info for “Archives Alchemy: the Art of the Dumpster Divers”:

The show runs from January 10 – April 24, 2014. Gallery Hours of Operation: M-F: 8:30 am – 4:45 pm. Second Saturday of each month: 8 am – 4 pm. Call 215-606-0101 for information

The Dumpster Divers of Philadelphia are a group of over 40 found object artists, their artwork as diverse as the group and materials used. They were officially recognized with a 2012 City of Philadelphia Mayor’s Tribute for “helping to raise the consciousness of art lovers and heightened awareness of taking a creative approach to support a more sustainable city, country and world.”

Now, the National Archives has preserved the past by passing outdated materials on to the Dumpster Diver artists. “Archives Alchemy: The Art of the Dumpster Divers” reminds us that objects have stories to tell, even those destined for the trash. This is very special trash with stories to tell!

Please visit the Dumpster Divers website for more info and links to the individual members websites.