Tag Archives: photos

Almost Time For The May Run of the Brimfield Antique Show By Lori Stabile | Special to The Republican

Brimfield 1800 from a sketch by Colonel John W. Foster
Brimfield 1800 from a sketch by Colonel John W. Foster

Great article on the Brimfield Outdoor Antiques Show next week. Go for the Brimfield Paper & Postcard Marathon beginning May 9th and stay for the Antiques blitz!

By Lori Stabile | Special to The Republican
It’s almost time for the May installment of the Brimfield Outdoor Antiques Shows, a thrice annual event that draws antique lovers from near and far to the tiny town of Brimfield, Mass. for six days at a time.

The May show – known as the largest antique show of the three – opens Tuesday, May 13 and runs through Sunday, May 18.

What is usually farmland transforms into a giant outdoor antique sale, featuring thousands of dealers on 23 fields selling almost everything imaginable – giant Ronald McDonald heads, garden items, 1950s dishes, postcards from various eras, music equipment, furniture, vintage jewelry and clothing and more.

It was 1959 when Gordon Reid got the idea to hold an outdoor antique show.

His daughters, Judith R. Mathieu and Jill R. Lukesh, continue the tradition their father started, on the J&J Promotions field, which is open only on Friday and Saturday and hosts 400 dealers.

Opening times vary according to field, with most opening Tuesday. Check www.brimfieldshow.com for specific field opening times.

The first “show” featured 67 dealers selling items on tarps in front of their station wagons, Mathieu said, describing the event as “rustic.”

Asked what Reid would think about Brimfield has become, Mathieu replied, “Oh my gosh, he would be thrilled. He would be quite honored, I’m sure.”

She said that she and her sister have maintained the quality that her father wanted on his field, ensuring dealers are selling antiques and not new items.

Because the family has been involved in the shows so long, Mathieu has plenty of advice for first-timers to the shows (the next show is in July, followed by the last one in September).

Dress comfortably, she suggests, and bring cash, as many dealers do not accept credit cards.

And bargain. Dealers expect it, Mathieu said, “but be fair in your offer.”

Even though Brimfield has been around now for many years, Mathieu said they still hear people tell them that this is their first time.

“People are just thrilled to be here,” Mathieu said.

Celebrity sightings are not unusual at Brimfield – home decor maven Martha Stewart, hockey great Terry O’Reilly, singer-actress Barbra Streisand and director-actress Penny Marshall all have been spotted in recent years.

Donald G. Moriarty, co-owner of Heart O’ the Mart with his wife Pamela, predicts that the May show will be “great.” They have been involved in the antiques show for the past 32 years, and he said he’s been seeing more international buyers at the shows.

“Each year seems to get a little bit bigger,” Moriarty said.

His field opens Wednesday at 9 a.m. with approximately 450 dealers. Like Mathieu, he advises people to dress “for comfort, not style” and in layers.

“Bring your wallet . . . Allocate as much time as you possibly can because it’s a huge, huge show,” Moriarty said.

Some fields charge admission. The next shows are July 8 to 13, and September 2 to 7.

Here is where to find maps and brochures for the Brimfield Show

Re-posted from Mass Live

Preserving Ephemera

Ran across this article which has some great advice about preservation and storage of your ephemera collection. Be sure to check out the link at the bottom of the post for a free eBook on ephemera preservation. Happy treasure hunting.

Most ephemera can be effectively handled by putting them in inexpensive polypropylene sheet protectors, and keeping these in a binder. The two clear sides of the protectors allow viewing of the items without destructive handling. Typically newspapers would have the relevant item cut out (either including the newspaper name, date, and page from the same sheet, or with that information noted on the retained item). Most items will fit into letter-sized protectors, but some may need some larger format.

Digital preservation is important, since the information can be better preserved and shared by having multiple backup and distributed copies. Flatbed scanners are usually the tool of choice to generate the images. 300 dpi (dots per inch) scan resolution is a good rule of thumb, although it may be more than needed for newspaper-like items. I like to name each scan file with the year, person and short subject indication. For cataloging, I usually rely on the descriptive filenames, which can be viewed and searched via the computer’s normal mechanisms. For a few kinds of items for which it seems important, I make text files with greater detail about the contents.

DON’T use the cheap plastic envelopes to keep your original paper records in. The chemicals in them destroy the contents over time. Use proper archive quality plastic envelopes if you wish to keep them in good order for future generations. – Colin Mar 20 at 7:26

I would start by investing in some (archival-quality) plastic binder pockets. For digital storage, a small flatbed scanner will get a better image, but a digital camera is also fine for recording a digital copy. Try to organize as you go (slip an article into the plastic, scan/photograph it, and then record any additional notes about it), although I would prioritize physical organization if you’re finding it overwhelming or you’re facing a time constraint.

The great thing about using binder pockets (assuming things will fit in them) is that it’s simple to:

1. take the binder to a family reunion and let everybody page through it

2. drastically reduce the possibility of damaging something while reading

3. take the collection to a library or other archive to look up vital records

4. reorganize the order

5. group by event (wedding, death, birth, etc.)

6. group pieces by family

7. group pieces by generation

8. or change your mind halfway through and switch your organization around!

Try to include your grandmother or other older relatives in the preservation process as much as possible — hopefully they will be thrilled that you’re excited about your family history and want to share all sorts of stories about the newspaper articles, photographs, etc. (Ironically, this makes the job of “family historian” harder, since you not only need to preserve the physical object, but also organize associated stories — but it is so, so worthwhile. The number of details and even new family relationships that I learned about when reading through newspaper articles with my grandmother was astounding.)

Ephemera comes in all shapes and sizes. Check out The Heirloom Registry to preserve the stories attached to ephemera found around the house. The online registry allows users to preserve and share the stories behind family heirlooms and precious belongings. You can see the Heirloom Registry sticker on the bottom of my teacup in this picture.

As another person mentioned, digital records, as simple as taking an image with your cell phone, are a good way to capture the information. I have done this with great success in photographing an old scrapbook full of newspaper clippings my grandfather made. I can zoom in and read all the text in the article clippings. The challenge with this is HOW DO YOU ADD CONTEXT AND METADATA TO A DIGITAL FILE? And therein lays the crux of your question. I would suggest that you do as the archivists would do. Assign each piece of ephemera it’s own unique identifier (number) and then in a separate document (notebook, text file or database) record the number and then all the contextual information you know about it. Like “Grandma clipped this out of the Washington Post when Aunt Mabel died” or “Cousin Grace gave Grandma this muffin recipe in 1960 – Grandma made it once, but thought it had too much baking soda, so she adjusted the recipe. She said it was Grandpa’s favorite :)”

I’ve been scanning the family photo albums and doing some acid-free repair as I go. I have a high quality flatbed scanner and have done the photos separately (both sides if there’s anything on the reverse) and transcribed any writing on the photo, photo back or page captions into the jpeg files information.

Then I set up a camera and photograph the entire album page with all photos on it. Context can be important.

After I have a set done, I put the photos up on a photoshare site (SmugMug in my case) in a private gallery so I can share them out and have an online backup of the information.

My next project is all the stories my grandmother handwrote to my siblings and I when we were children relating her growing up in Texas and New Mexico during the great depression. They are priceless to all our family.

There is now a free eBook in PDF format available from here all about preservation of records that is well worth downloading and reading imho.

Free Ebook about ephemera preservation:
http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/documents/ebookpdf_march18.pdf

EPHEMERA RESCUE

Coconut Grove Theatre
Irreplaceable Playbills, Costumes And Ephemera Rescued From Coconut Grove | Florida Theater On Stage

image

Read how the Playbills and other Ephemera, costumes and props were saved from rotting in storage. Can’t wait to see the results of the restoration process.

Irreplaceable Playbills, Costumes And Ephemera Rescued From Coconut Grove

via Irreplaceable Playbills, Costumes And Ephemera Rescued From Coconut Grove | Florida Theater On Stage.


Don’t Chuck it Out Til You Contact Me!

WANTED:
We buy all kinds of vintage photography, paper documents (ephemera), postcards & old books. Whether you are selling a personal collection, inherited items or need assistance in handling the estate of a relative, 9 Miles of Ephemera and Vintage will provide experienced & professional service. We are willing to travel to your location or simply bring items to the shop.

Email Me for more info. cdprops@me.com

Don’t throw anything away!

PHOTOS
I collect every possible format of photography, including b&w & color family SNAPSHOTS, from photography’s inception to the 1980s, erotic images, both male & female, family photo ALBUMS, real photo postcards, military photo albums, especially WWII & vietnam, old TRAVEL albums to locations such as Asia, Africa & the Middle East, SLIDES, vocational photography, such as medical, dental, industrial or police MUG SHOTS & crime photos, X-Rays, 8 & 16mm FILM REELS,  etc.

BOOKS
I specialize in collectible books with strong visual content, especially quality titles on PHOTOGRAPHY,  art, architecture & DESIGN. Other interests include old illustrated CHILDREN’S BOOKS, Nature books, and Vintage Medical Books . In short, my reading & collecting interests are diverse; I’ll gladly take a look at any book that is old, RARE or otherwise unique. We are willing to travel to take a look at large collections.    

EPHEMERA
Ephemera is a catch-all word for the incidental paper items that people have used on a daily basis throughout history. I collect postcards, pamphlets, old LETTERS, journals & diaries, menus, business ledgers & INVOICES, travel brochures, trade CATALOGS, instruction manuals, event programs, train tickets, POSTERS, broadsides, recipe booklets, scrapbooks, AMATEUR ART, greeting cards, children’s drawings & SCHOOLWORK, valentines, etc. The list goes on  & on. As a general rule, don’t throw anything away until we’ve had a chance to look at it first.

MAPS
From road maps to atlases to surveyor maps to pocket travel maps….I want to see them all!!
I am mainly interested in pre-1900 era maps, but will look at anything you have. Send photos to us and we can discuss pricing.